Onur Yazıcıgil

Continuous text typefaces versus display typefaces in the Ottoman Empire

TYPO Berlin 2015 Character | Friday, 22 May | 4:00 pm | Show | English

Ever since the first Arabic script printed book occurred in the Ottoman Empire (1729) the naskh style was established as a continuous text typeface. The persistent use of this style was often accompanied with the nasta’liq, ruq’ha and thuluth styles, and later kufic, which was used especially for headlines in the display type format. This presentation aims to illustrate the key characters and visual differences of the Ottoman Empire’s use of continuous text typefaces versus it’s use of display typefaces.

Onur Yazıcıgil

Onur Yazıcıgil

Graphic Designer, Type Designer (Istanbul)

Onur received his MFA from Purdue University where he researched the evolution of humanist and grotesque sans serif typefaces. He won the first prize in typography in 2007 from the Society of Typographic Arts in Chicago. He is a faculty member at Sabancı University in the VCD program. He is…

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